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Criminal Law


The odds are that at some point in your life, either you or someone you know will be arrested and charged with a crime.  Your personal freedom depends upon many factors, such as a proper investigation, use of expert witnesses, plea bargaining strategies, and proper trial technique.  Both Louis and Brian Dell have the knowledge and over a decade of trial experience in defending people against all kinds of criminal charges. We understand the complexities of the legal system and are prepared to fight for your freedom.  Please feel free to browse through the frequently asked questions listed below. Table of Contents
  1. The police want to question me about a crime. Should I cooperate?
  2. I'm on a road trip with some friends.  I get stopped for speeding.  The officer asks me if I have any problems with him searching my vehicle.  What should I do?
  3. I've been charged with a crime. What next?
  4. I know I did the crime.  If I cooperate, will that lessen my punishment?
  5. What is a misdemeanor?
  6. What is a felony?
  7. Can I have my criminal conviction removed from my record?

The police want to question me about a crime.  Should I cooperate?

Let's put this bluntly:  No.

The police are trained to extract information from you.  The officers may be pleasant or friendly; mean and abusive; they may play good-cop/bad-cop; whatever the case, they will attempt to elicit information which they can use to connect you to a crime.  The average person mistakenly believes that the officer is the judge or jury and will weigh any statements made in order to determine whether to detain or arrest the person--don't you make that mistake.  Consider this: when the police are questioning you, they already suspect you have committed a crime.  Your words can only confirm their suspicions--your silence will give you the most protection.  Ask for a lawyer immediately, and do not talk to the police--ever.

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I'm on road trip with some friends.  I get stopped for speeding.  The officer asks me if I have any problems with him searching my vehicle.  What should I do?

Kindly tell the officer you do not agree to a search of any kind.  If you are asked what you have to hide, simply tell the officer you do not wish to answer any questions.  You see, if you invite the police to search you or give them permission to search you or your car, if they find something, they will prosecute you for it.  What if it isn't yours and you didn't put it there?  Who is the jury going to believe, you or the police?  It won't make any difference who put it there if the police say they found it in your possession.  So refuse to let them look.

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I've been charged with a crime.  What next?

Don't panic.  Call a lawyer immediately.  If you are in jail, your attorney can assist you in contacting a bail bondsman and arranging the assistance of friends and family members in managing your affairs until you are released.

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I know I did the crime. If I cooperate with the police, won't that lessen my punishment?

No.  The police do not have the power to reduce your punishment, only the prosecutor and judge have such abilities.  Yet another reason not to cooperate with the police.  An experienced defense attorney can negotiate with the prosecution in order to obtain a reduced or fair sentence. 

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What is a misdemeanor?

Misdemeanors are crimes where the maximum possible jail term is no greater than one year.  Typically, these include first time DUIs, minor assaults, petty theft, trespass.

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What is a felony?

Felonies are crimes where the maximum possible jail term exceeds one year.  These are serious crimes such as grand theft, robbery, homicide, sex crimes.  Even after you have done your time and completed all of the terms of probation or parole, you will likely have lifelong consequences such as the inability to vote, difficulty in obtaining employment, immigration problems.  In the case of sex crimes, you will be required to register with the local authorities for life.

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Can I have my criminal conviction removed from my record?

In some cases, the answer is yes.  If you have successfully completed the terms and conditions of your misdemeanor sentence, your attorney can lead you through the process of "expunging" or erasing your criminal record.  Once your criminal conviction has been expunged, it is as if you have never been convicted of that crime.  Talk to an experienced attorney for more details about expunging your record.

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